HOME
POLITICS & GOV.
CURRENT EVENTS
WAR ON TERROR
COMMENTARY
COLUMNS
EDITOR'S ARTICLES
CONTACT
RESOURCES
United States Constitution
Declaration of Independence
American Spectator
AmericanTruckersAtWar
Breitbart.com
CNS News
Conservative Voice
Daley Times-Post
Defense Dept
DEBKAfiles
Drudge Report
Fox News
GreatMindsThinkRight
Intelligence Summit
Iron Pony Express
Kook Alert
Mich News
National Review
New Media Journal
NewsMax
Patriot Post
Politico
Real Clear Politics
Renew America
Stars & Stripes
Ugly Puppy
Washington Times
World Net Daily
Immigration Counter
BLOGOSPHERE
Captain's Quarters
Free Republic
Instapundit
Lit Green Footballs
Michelle Malkin
Power Line
Townhall.com
SHOW HOSTS

ASSOC. EDITOR
CHARLOTTE BAKER

CONTRIBUTING
WRITERS
CHRISTOPHER ADAMO
ALAN BURKHART
PAUL HOLLRAH
PAUL A. IBBETSON
MARIE JON'
RAYMOND S. KRAFT
JOHN LONGENECKER
FRANK SALVATO
NANCY SALVATO
JOAN SWIRSKY
J.B. WILLIAMS

FEATURES
Davie Crockett
(It's not yours to give)


Communist Goals for America
(It's happening now)


Nuclear Attack
(Be Prepared)


Story behind the
Star Spangled Banner

(6 Min. Audio)

GAJ ARCHIVES
Barack Obama's Race Based Church
 
Obama's pastor and spiritual advisor, Jeremiah Wright, runs a church that seems more a black advocacy group than a church.  He was, at least at one time associated with Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam.  It appears that he preaches more about the advancement of blacks than about God and Christ.  When did Christianity ever make a distinction between people of different races?  Not until the Reverend Dr. Jeremiah A. Wright founded the Trinity United Church of Christ.  After reading the information provided on the church website, you have to wonder why he elected to include the word "United" in the name of his church.  United with who, Africa?  It's certainly not white Americans he is untied with.
 
The following is taken directly from the Trinity United Church of Christ website at http://www.tucc.org/home.htm

"We are a congregation which is Unashamedly Black and Unapologetically Christian... Our roots in the Black religious experience and tradition are deep, lasting and permanent. We are an African people, and remain "true to our native land," the mother continent, the cradle of civilization. God has superintended our pilgrimage through the days of slavery, the days of segregation, and the long night of racism. It is God who gives us the strength and courage to continuously address injustice as a people, and as a congregation. We constantly affirm our trust in God through cultural expression of a Black worship service and ministries which address the Black Community."

The Pastor as well as the membership of Trinity United Church of Christ is committed to a 10-point Vision:

  1. A congregation committed to ADORATION.
  2. A congregation preaching SALVATION.
  3. A congregation actively seeking RECONCILIATION.
  4. A congregation with a non-negotiable COMMITMENT TO AFRICA.
  5. A congregation committed to BIBLICAL EDUCATION.
  6. A congregation committed to CULTURAL EDUCATION.
  7. A congregation committed to the HISTORICAL EDUCATION OF AFRICAN PEOPLE IN DIASPORA.
  8. A congregation committed to LIBERATION.
  9. A congregation committed to RESTORATION.
  10. A congregation working towards ECONOMIC PARITY.
 
The talking points of Reverend Dr. Jeremiah A. Wright http://www.tucc.org/talking_points.htm

"Dr. Wright’s talking points (3.1.7) for Trinity United Church of Christ its Web site and the Black Value System (in response to Erik Rush’s comments (2.28.07) on the Hannity and Colmes show):

• One of the biggest gaps in knowledge that causes the kind of ignorance that you hear spouted by this man [Erik Rush] and those like him, has to do with the fact that these persons are completely ignorant when it comes to the Black religious tradition. The vision statement of Trinity United Church of Christ is based upon the systematized liberation theology that started in 1969 with the publication of Dr. James Cone’s book, Black Power and Black Theology.

• Black theology is one of the many theologies in the Americas that became popular during the liberation theology movement. They include Hispanic theology, Native American theology, Asian theology and Womanist theology.

• I use the word “systematized” because Black liberation theology was in existence long before Dr. Cone’s book. It originates in the days of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. It was systematized and published by theologians, Old Testament scholars, New Testament scholars, ethicists, church historians, and historians of religion such as Dr. James Cone, Dr. Cain Hope Felder, Dr. Gayraud Wilmore, Dr. Jacqueline Grant, Dr. Kelley Brown Douglas, Dr. Renita Weems, Dr. Katie Cannon, Dr. Dwight Hopkins, Dr. Linda Thomas, and Dr. Randall Bailey.

• These scholars, who write in various disciplines, also include seminary presidents like Dr. John Kinney and professors of Hebrew Bible, like Dr. Jerome Ross. Black liberation theology defines Africans and African Americans as subjects – not the objects which colonizers and oppressors have consistently defined “others” as.

• We [African Americans] were always seen as objects. When we started defining ourselves, it scared those who try to control others by naming them and defining them for them; Oppressors do not like “others” defining themselves.

• To have a church whose theological perspective starts from the vantage point of Black liberation theology being its center, is not to say that African or African American people are superior to any one else.

• African-centered thought, unlike Eurocentrism, does not assume superiority and look at everyone else as being inferior.

• There is more than one center from which to view the world. In the words of Dr. Janice Hale, “Difference does not mean deficience.” It is from this vantage point that Black liberation theology speaks.

• Systematized Black liberation theology is 40 years old. Scholars of African and African American religious history show that Black liberation theology, however, has been in existence for 400 years. It is found in the songs, the sermons, the testimonies and the oral literature of Africans throughout the Diaspora."

Would you feel comfortable attending this church, assuming you could even get in?  Why does Barack Obama feel comfortable attending this church?  Would they become a part of his administration if elected president?